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Health News

4 ways to relax at your office on National Relaxation Day
iStock/Thinkstock (NEW YORK) -- Wednesday is National Relaxation Day.If you are stuck at work and missing out on a spa day or reading at the beach, relax, literally.We've got you covered."Good Morning America" turned to two experts for tips on how to relax while you're at work.The good news is that relaxation doesn't mean you have to lay down on a couch or take a nap, two things that would turn heads in the office."Simply plopping on the couch doesn’t address the long-held tension in your body," said Jillian Pransky, author of "Deep Listening" and a mindfulness teacher and certified...
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Sleep loss can make people more isolated and lonely: Study
iStock/Thinkstock BY: DR. RICHA KALRA DR. RYAN GUINNESS(NEW YORK) -- It only takes one sleepless night to ruin social interactions and make people feel lonely, a new study showed.In 1942 the average American used to sleep about 7.9 hours, according to the National Gallup survey, but now the average American's busy schedule has decreased the average amount of sleep to 6.5 hours."Mother nature took millions of years to perfect our sleep and we just shaved off over an hour to fit our lifestyle," Dr. Matt Walker, founder and director of Center for Human Sleep Science at University of California-Berkeley and...
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New 'zombie' gene found in elephants could help humans fight cancer
iStock/Thinkstock (NEW YORK) -- They may not be the fastest or the smartest or even the scariest, but when it comes to beating cancer, elephants are the superheroes of the living world.It's a phenomenon that has baffled scientists since the 1970s. After all, at their size, they should have a much higher rate of the disease. The larger a living thing, the more the cells, and the more the cells, the more chance one of them turns out to be cancerous -- which is why tall people are more vulnerable to the disease than short people and why Marmaduke is...
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Suicide risk nearly double for traumatic brain injury sufferers: Study
iStock/Thinkstock (NEW YORK) -- People who have been identified as having suffered a traumatic brain injury have almost double the risk of suicide than people without the condition, a new study by researchers in Denmark has found.The study, published Tuesday in the medical journal JAMA, examined 34,529 deaths by suicide over 35 years from a Danish national registry and people who had medical contact for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Researchers not only found an increased risk of suicide between traumatic brain injury sufferers and the general population, they also found that the risk of suicide was even higher for people...
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Hilarious photo shoot celebrates parents' empty nest
Laura Eskridge (SPRINGBORO, Ohio) -- Some parents despair at the thought of their kids leaving home. But not Vicky and Jeff Piper.The Springboro, Ohio, couple was so looking forward to their youngest child leaving for college, they celebrated with a photo shoot.It was her husband's idea, Vicky Piper told "Good Morning America.""We had just dropped our son at school and I was receiving all these texts asking if we were ok, have I stopped crying, your house is going to be so quiet and what are you guys going to do now?" she said. "We just had a different perspective...
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Black boys more fearful in whiter neighborhoods, study finds
iStock/Thinkstock BY: DR. ANNA CHACON (NEW YORK) -- Young black men expect increased scrutiny, surveillance and even direct targeting when in areas that have more white people than they typically encounter, a study has found.Researchers from the Department of Sociology at Ohio State University gave 506 black boys aged 11 to 17 smartphones to track their locations every 30 seconds for a week. The boys were asked where they were, with whom and how safe they felt around Columbus, Ohio, on a scale of 1 to 5. The mini survey took place from 2014 to 2016. Researchers received almost 7,400...
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Body positive model Iskra Lawrence says: 'You are good enough'
Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images (NEW YORK) -- Iskra Lawrence is a 27-year-old body positive model and activist on a mission to change the world.You may recognize Lawrence from her many lingerie campaigns with Aerie, American Eagle Outfitter’s intimate apparel brand, or from social media, where she has amassed a following of millions preaching about self-love and body acceptance.Once you notice Lawrence, her fresh face and positive outlook make her hard to forget. But it hasn't always been that way for the English model, who told "GMA" how she developed severe body and mental health issues after hearing she was too curvy...
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Celery juice is the latest wellness trend: Is it one you should follow?
iStock/Thinkstock (NEW YORK) -- Supermodel Miranda Kerr says she drinks it every morning and actress Busy Philipps has talked about it with her 1.1 million Instagram followers.Speaking of Instagram, you’ve probably seen it all over your feed.It is celery juice, the latest wellness trend gaining buzz on social media and with celebrities and health gurus.“When juicing came back [in trend], it was all about fruit. Now with carb and sugar phobia, I think vegetable juices have taken hold again,” said Cynthia Sass, RD, CSSD, a New York City and Los Angeles based performance dietitian. “Celery does check several boxes in...
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Positive thinking can be healthy, but reality checks are important: Study
iStock/Thinkstock BY: DR. RICHA KALRA (NEW YORK) -- Thinking positively is often good for brain health -- but a new study shows it's important to proceed with caution.Positive thoughts seem to increase connections between regions of the brain in favorable ways. But the study, published in The Journal of Neuroscience, showed that optimism can also come with risks."We were interested to show the science behind an old phenomenon, called the optimism bias," said co-author, Dr. Bojana Kuzmanovic, Cognitive neuroscientist at Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, in an interview with ABC News. "What we conclude and believe depends on what...
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Study: Young children talking back and forth with adults strengthens language regions of brain
iStock/Thinkstock BY: DR. EDITH BRACHO-SANCHEZ and DR. RICHA KALRA(NEW YORK) -- Adults who hold back-and-forth conversations with young children rather than just talking to them may be helping to strengthen connections between the language regions of the children’s brains, new research shows.The new study published today in The Journal of Neuroscience found that dialogue with adults may lead to stronger pathways between two brain regions critical for language development in young children.“Our findings show that the information highways between the language regions of the brain were stronger in children who took turns talking with their parents, and the greater connectivity...
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Baby boy dies after he's left for hours in hot car in Domino's Pizza parking lot
ABC News (EMPORIA, Va.) -- A 6-month-old boy died after being left for hours in a hot car in a parking lot outside a Domino's restaurant in Virginia, police said.The baby's mother, an employee at the Domino's in Emporia, Virginia, had dropped off one or two other children at a day care Friday before driving to work, Emporia Police Chief Rick Pinksaw told ABC News Monday.The baby was in the car for several hours, Pinksaw said, though he declined to specify exactly how long.Officers responded to the parking lot at about 9 p.m. and performed CPR on the infant before...
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FDA approves marketing for a contraception app for the 1st time
iStock/Thinkstock (NEW YORK) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the first time ever has green-lighted a birth control app to be marketed as a method of contraception.The app, Natural Cycles, calculates when a woman is most likely to be fertile using their daily body temperature data and their menstrual cycle information.The app then tells users what days they are more likely to be fertile and should abstain from sex or use protection if they do not wish to get pregnant."Consumers are increasingly using digital health technologies to inform their everyday health decisions, and this new app can provide...
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