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Maker of masks for health care workers accused of making defective earplugs for military
wellesenterprises/iStock (NEW YORK) -- 3M, the maker of tens of millions of respirator masks to be purchased by the U.S. government for health care workers battling the novel coronavirus, was accused several years ago of knowingly selling defective earplugs to the military in a federal lawsuit settled with the U.S. Justice Department. The St. Paul, Minnesota-headquartered company denies any wrongdoing and maintains the earplugs were not defective. To settle the case, first brought by a competitor and joined by the Defense Logistic Agency, the company agreed to pay the federal government $9 million in 2018 but did not admit any...
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New York City's motorcycle community is riding to save lives
Bilanol/iStock (NEW YORK) -- The orders were straightforward and immediate: pick up the supplies, ride through the streets of New York City and make the deliveries. There would be no detours, no diversions. The clock was ticking. On March 21, Ryan Snelson and three other motorcycle riders geared up, divided up the supplies and took off from Montauk, New York, to meet their receivers in Tribeca and Queens. The supplies strapped to their bikes would help protect the doctors, nurses and other health care professionals battling the deadly novel coronavirus pandemic. New York City hospitals were running out of personal...
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Couple test positive for COVID-19, share message with other young adults
Noemi Orofino (NEW YORK) -- A 28-year-old who said she and her boyfriend tested positive for the novel coronavirus is speaking out in hopes to remind the public that young, healthy adults are still at risk.Noemi Orofino and her boyfriend Julian, 31, are now in recovery after fighting the COVID-19 virus, the new respiratory illness in which hundreds of thousands have been diagnosed globally, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. Orofino, who works in fashion, began documenting her journey on Instagram after revealing she was positive."I started getting so many...
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As states crack down on gatherings, some religious exemptions could keep pews full
iStock (NEW YORK ) -- Despite repeated warnings from health experts about the risk of social interaction over novel coronavirus, governors in at least three states have exempted houses of worship from statewide bans on mass gatherings, and this weekend will offer a first test to see if any congregations forge ahead despite the warnings.Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat, has banned gatherings of 50 or more and signed a statewide stay-at-home order on Monday. But both mandates explicitly exempt houses of worship from the misdemeanor penalty for violators."That’s an area we don’t have the ability to directly enforce or...
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New 3D printing techniques could ease medical supply shortages in coronavirus fight
iStock (NEW YORK) -- As health care providers across the nation continuing testing for the novel coronavirus, many medical supplies are in high demand and short supply. In particular, there's a dire shortage of nasal swabs used for testing.A team at Northwell Health in New Hyde Park, New York, might have a solution: a publicly available template for 3D-printed nasal swabs."With the COVID-19 virus, our best weapon against it right now is widespread testing," said Dr. Todd Goldstein, director of 3D Design and Innovation at Northwell Health. "This swab is the first line of defense, so to speak, against the...
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Louisiana researchers studying monkeys for a coronavirus vaccine face challenges as state cases spike
iStock (NEW ORLEANS) -- In Louisiana, amid skyrocketing rates of the novel coronavirus and a statewide stay-at-home order, scientists are finding themselves face-to-face with the virus they hope to develop a vaccine for.At the Tulane National Primate Research Center (TNPRC), scientists from across the United States are coordinating their research in nonhuman primates, like rhesus macaques, to develop diagnostics, treatments and vaccines for the novel coronavirus, COVID-19.These scientists are on the front lines of fighting COVID-19. Like health care workers and first responders across the country, they understand how fast they have to work to save as many lives as...
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At-home coronavirus test kits are still not in the hands of consumers: Here's why
iStock (NEW YORK) -- As government and health care officials plead for expanded access to high-speed COVID-19 tests, health care companies across the country began mobilizing their resources to meet the growing demands with direct-to-consumer kits.The benefits of such kits could be substantial, allowing everyday people to test themselves for COVID-19 in the privacy of their homes instead of visiting a hospital, potentially exposing health care workers and other healthy individuals. If the test came back negative, it could allow them to go back to work without fear of infecting others.But the path to commercialization has been a bumpy one....
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'It's a mess': Coronavirus pandemic exposes New York City's vulnerabilities
iStock (NEW YORK) -- When Dr. Darien Sutton saw what was happening in Italy, he braced himself.Sutton, an emergency medicine physician in Queens, New York, anticipated that the reality in Italy during the novel coronavirus pandemic -- not enough hospital beds, a lack of protective gear -- would soon become the reality in the U.S.In New York City, he was right."Right now, looking at a large hospital in Queens, the medical intensive care unit is already at capacity," Sutton told ABC News on Friday.He hopes it will serve as a wake-up call for other communities throughout the country on how...
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What we know about coronavirus' long-term effects
iStock (NEW YORK) -- In the months since the novel coronavirus exploded into a pandemic, we have heard a range of stories about those who have been stricken by the disease -- the vast majority with mild symptoms, but an increasing number needing to be hospitalized.But what about those who were reported to have recovered from the illness, which has no inoculation or cure?While the telltale symptoms of coronavirus, including fever, dry cough and shortness of breath, have been well-publicized, there's been less information about the long-term health of people who contract COVID-19 and recover.In part, that's because the virus...
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Website allows people to report coronavirus symptoms, track spread
iStock (NEW YORK) -- As health experts and public officials have warned that confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus are likely nowhere near the actual number of people infected, medical professionals in Boston have created a website to help close the gap."COVID Near You" allows the public to report coronavirus-related symptoms. The site asks users how they are feeling with the options of "Great, thanks!" and "Not feeling well" as answers.Those who answer that they're not feeling well are asked to identify their symptoms and answer a series of questions, such as when they began to feel ill, if they...
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Can recovered coronavirus patients help combat the disease?
narvikk/iStock (NEW YORK) -- It's a critical, urgent question in the battle to save American lives -- and one that a growing number of institutions, including one of New York's preeminent medical centers, will attempt to answer.Dr. David Reich, the president of Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan, said his team of experts is in the process of tracking down possible donors -- recovered patients whose blood antibodies could potentially curb the virus in the sickest patients.“It’s great that we have some avenues and some options to try to improve the treatment of our patients,” Reich said in an exclusive television...
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Iran confronts deadly alcohol crisis in midst of dealing with coronavirus
iStock (NEW YORK) -- Iran, already struggling to fight the growing spread of novel coronavirus, is now coming to grips with an alcohol poisoning problem that has killed hundreds of people this year.In the wake of the deaths, officials initially blamed misinformation on social media for convincing victims that drinking alcohol could protect them against coronavirus. But a change in explanation from doctors is opening eyes to a larger problem of bootleg alcohol in the country."The first few days we all thought patients had drunken alcohol to protect themselves of corona, as some of them claimed so," Gholam Hosein Mohebbi,...
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